photo by Liz Linder

Great artists give free concerts at New England Conservatory—simply because they teach here.

All Aboard the
Northeast Corridor (NEC)
Boston–New York

New England Conservatory's Kenneth Radnofsky has been a soloist saxophone player for various orchestras and musical groups around the world. Fellow NEC faculty member, pianist Damien Francoeur-Krzyzek accompanies him on this concert.

Tonight's performance will include the Boston premiere, and second performance ever, of a new composition by David Amram titled Three Greenwich Village Portraits. The piece was commissioned by Radnofsky and the World-Wide Concurrent Premieres and Commissioning Fund, an organization Radnofsky founded to share newly commissioned pieces globally. The NEC performance takes place only one day after the world premiere in New York City. Works on this program by Donald Martino and Jeremy Van Buskirk also originated as Radnofsky commissions.

Jeremy Van Buskirk A Sigh Felt Across the Earth for Alto-Saxophone and Electronics world premiere

Michael Horvit Antiphon for Alto-Saxophone and Electronic Sounds

Donald Martino Piccolo Studio for Solo Saxophone

David Amram Greenwich Village Portraits for Saxophone and Piano
WWCF world premiere series
MacDougal Street (for Arthur Miller)
Bleecker Street (for Odetta)
Christopher Street (for Frank McCourt)

Leonard Bernstein Sonata for Clarinet and Piano

George Gershwin arr. Radnofsky Three Preludes

Gordon Jenkins arr. Radnofsky Benny Goodman's "Goodbye"

Read Kenneth Radnofsky's notes on this program.

Date: February 17, 2014 - 8:00:PM
Price: Free
Location: NEC’s Jordan Hall

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NEC's FREE concerts do not require a ticket, unless stated in concert listing.
Unreserved seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.
Doors open 30 minutes prior to the concert's start time.


WITHOUT CRAFTSMANSHIP, INSPIRATION IS A MERE REED SHAKEN IN THE WIND. JOHANNES BRAHMS