Born in New York City, violinist-violist Stephanie Lin Hsu began her musical studies at Hoff-Barthelson Music School at age four. Her formal music education has included violin studies with William DePasquale, Barbara Govatos, and Peggy Klinger, and chamber music studies with Marcantonio Barone, David Geber, and Gerald Robbins. Stephanie has performed at Carnegie Hall on numerous occasions, both as Concertmistress of the New York Youth Symphony under the direction of Paul Haas, and as the principal violinist of selected honors ensembles of the New York Youth Symphony’s renowned Chamber Music Program.

Stephanie graduated with High Honors from Swarthmore College in 2008, with a B.A. in Educational Studies, Sociology, and Anthropology. During her undergraduate career at Swarthmore, Stephanie worked intensively with the Chester Children’s Chorus—a program for blossoming young musicians in the historically under-resourced district of Chester, Pennsylvania—as a music teacher and as the coordinator of the Chorus’s academic tutoring program. As an arts organizer, Stephanie has also partnered with the Chester Education Foundation to bring arts programming to after-school programs in Chester, and spearheaded organizing efforts with Art for Change to bring musical programming to the Hacia Afuera Public Arts Festival in East Harlem, New York.

In her most recent work as a New-York-based activist-educator, Stephanie has designed and led youth programs through Chinatown Youth Initiatives, which catalyze sustainable youth activism in Manhattan's Chinatown. Additionally, Stephanie has dedicated herself to teaching at CITYterm at the Masters School—an interdisciplinary and experience-based educational program for high school youth that cultivates youth empowerment and global citizenship through critical thinking. Stephanie has received numerous awards for her work in music, education, and activism, including the Rosengarten String Scholarship, Garrigues Music Scholarship, Scholars in Service to Pennsylvania Award, and Edward Said / Audre Lorde Scholar-Activism Award.

2011-04-11


IT'S LIKE AN ACT OF MURDER; YOU PLAY WITH INTENT TO COMMIT SOMETHING. DUKE ELLINGTON