Opportunities for Student Involvement

As a culture of community service is strongly promoted at NEC, students are encouraged by faculty and administrators to participate in the Community Performances and Partnerships Program. Any student who is interested may sign up to be involved on a volunteer basis as much or little as their schedule allows. Additionally, some students have class, program, or studio requirements that include participation in these programs.

Students who are interested in a more extensive outreach experience may apply to participate in one of NEC's Community Performances and Partnerships Fellowships. Students who are accepted into these programs receive an honorarium for their participation. All students who perform/work in community settings receive training through workshops, one-on-one mentoring, classes, seminars, and peer feedback sessions.  Below are the five fellowship program opportunities currently offered through the CPP Program:

  • Individual Fellowship Program
  • Musical Storytelling Fellowship Program
  • Teaching Fellowship Program
  • Ensemble Fellowship Program
  • Holiday Ensemble Fellowship Program

View a complete description of each of the CPP Fellowship Programs.


If you are a current NEC student and would like to more information on ways that you can be involved in the program, please read through our Frequently Asked Questions, or contact:

Tanya Maggi, Director of Community Performances and Partnerships
New England Conservatory
290 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 585-1243
tanya.maggi@necmusic.edu

What Students Are Saying

"The CPP Program reaffirms that what I am doing really does make a difference, and that I am practicing for more than just self gain." - Mary Lynch '10 B.M., Oboe Performance

"The past two years, as a member of the Euroca Quartet (an NEC Honors Ensemble), and with a solo piano Fellowship, I have been very fortunate to be able to perform all over Boston.  I feel that because of the outreach program, I am much more confident, and much more coherent.  NEC students are so lucky to have the CPP Program.  Everyone should take full advantage of this incredible opportunity which is so easily accessible." - Andrei Baumann '09 M.M., Piano Performance

"Participating in CPP has given me an incredible opportunity to share music with those who appreciate it but cannot easily attend concerts.  It's made me remember the power of music.  I loved hearing the gracious feedback from listeners after our concerts, and collaborating with my good friend.  Thank you, CPP, for making this year memorable!" - Angela Theis '10 M.M., Vocal Performance

Student Spotlight

The New England Conservatory Community Performances and Partnerships Program is shining its spotlight on two of our outstanding teaching fellows. CPP Teaching Fellows are matched with partnering schools or community organizations in the Boston area. NEC students in the fellowship program visit partnering sites on a weeklly basis to provide lessons, sectionals, and/or music enrichment activities.

Stephanie Munoz and Sarah Hughes are first year Master students who currently serve as teaching fellows at Margarita Muniz Academy. In this interview, they describe their involvement with teh CPP Pogram. Although this is just their first year at New England Conservatory, both students are actively involved with the Boston community!

Stephanie Munoz

Interview with Stephanie Munoz

CPP Program: How did you find out about the CPP Program? How did you first get involved?

Stephanie Munoz
: During orientation week, there was a meet and greet event where all the programs/clubs at NEC had display booths and representatives. I’m a very curious person, and was naturally drawn to the CPP booth. I walked up and met Tanya who was just so sweet! She explained what the CPP program was and I knew immediately that I had to do it! I grabbed an application for every fellowship that they offer, filled them out that afternoon and turned them in the very next day.        

CPP: How are you involved in CPP?

SM
: This is my first semester as a graduate student, so I do not have a previous history with the CPP program. I applied for the individual, story-telling and teaching fellowships and after meeting with the CPP staff we all decided that the teaching fellowship was a great fit for me. Now, I visit the Margarita Muñiz Academy every Tuesday and teach 9th - 10th graders saxophone, clarinet, and flute. I go in each week to help with any section – even brass!

CPP: What do you like about the Teaching Fellowship?

SM: I absolutely love teaching! For me, it's never about what I can teach the students, it's always about what the students will be teaching me. I find this fun and exciting! You can have a lesson plan, but you cannot plan their reaction to your teaching, and I like that spontaneity.

CPP: Are you learning any skills as a teaching fellow that you will take with you in the future?

SM: My bachelor degree is in Music Education, and I have been fortunate enough to have taught in a variety of music settings, so I feel very comfortable in the teaching environment. Through this fellowship with the
CPP program, I am gaining even more real-life teaching experience and am continuing to grow as a music educator.

CPP: What do you like about the CPP Program?

SM: I love the staff! Tanya, Indra and Raquel are sweet, hardworking ladies who want nothing but the best experience for each of the CPP fellows. I also really enjoy meeting other CPP fellows who share the same interests and are just as passionate about music and education.

CPP: What would you tell other students who are interested in being a CPP fellow?

SM: I know that those who are interested will apply, but for any student that is unsure about it, I would say “You’ve gotta do it!” You have absolutely nothing to lose and everything to gain from being a CPP fellow!

CPP: Do you have a favorite story about a CPP experience?

SM: The Margarita Muñiz Academy is the first and only bilingual high school in the greater Boston area. The band directors (Rebecca and Avi) speak enough Spanish to be able to communicate basic music terms, however, they are not fluent. Last semester, when I arrived for my first observation, I introduced myself in English and in Spanish. You should have seen the look on all the students’ faces! They were quite surprised and amazed that I speak fluent Spanish and it is because of this that I formed a bond with the students on the first day.

CPP: What are some fun facts about you?

SM: I love salsa dancing, and I'm good at it too! You can always catch me dancing with or without a dance floor. I also enjoy make up and fashion. Since I’ve moved to Boston, I am often mistaken for a vocalist because I’m “put-together” and just have that look. (I’m not really sure what this means, but I take it as a compliment).  I'm also a really good cook. I can make any dish, but I usually end up cooking Mexican food because I miss it so much! Some of my favorite Mexican dishes to make are fajitas, breakfast tacos, and green chile chicken enchiladas. I miss menudo and huevos rancheros the most! It's hard to explain what menudo is...it's a spicy soup made with meat and hominy and it's delicious!

CPP: Do you have any other thoughts or reflections you would like?

SM: I am very thankful for the CPP program and my fellowship. Growing up in El Paso, the majority of the population is Hispanic and most of the people who study music have their degree in education, not performance. I fit into both of those categories, but after 25 years of “fitting in,” I finally found out (through my fellowship) just how unique I am! I cannot thank the CPP staff enough for their support – they have helped me see all the great things I have to offer as a musician and educator and given me the tools to share this with the Boston community.
 
Sarah Hughes

Interview with Sarah Hughes

CPP Program: How did you find out about the CPP Program? How did you first get involved?

Sarah Hughes: I found out about CPP by going to the info sessions during orientation week. As someone who had taught music in public schools in Maryland for five years prior to moving to Boston, I was really hoping to get a teaching opportunity that would work with my academic schedule. When I saw that CPP offered a Teaching Fellowship I immediately applied.

CPP: How are you involved in CPP?

SH: As a Teaching Fellow, I get the opportunity to work with 1st year instrumental music students at Margarita Muniz Academy in Jamaica Plain. The academy, established in 2012, is the first dual language high school of the Boston Public Schools and has only grades 9 and 10 right now, but plans to add a grade each year. I go in once a week and work with groups of beginning brass, woodwind, and percussion students. Along with field experience, CPP offers masterclasses on things like teaching artistry and public speaking.

CPP: What do you like about the Teaching Fellowship?

SH: I feel like the people at CPP really cared about what kind of placement would work for me and as a result, I feel completely comfortable in my teaching situation. The location is convenient to my home, the skill level of the students is what I was accustomed to from my previous experience, and the teachers at my placement are more than ready to give me a group to work with alone for an hour. I also like that my CPP supervisor comes out as an observer sometimes and can offer tips and advice on what she sees.

CPP: Are you learning any skills as a teaching fellow that you will take with you in the future?

SH: I haven’t been in my placement for very long but I am already starting to discover new ways of dealing with older beginners. Back in Maryland, for the most part, I was working with 4th or 5th grade beginners, along with the occasional adult student. Teaching beginning 9th grade students is fun because some already have a developed sense of what music they like. In some cases, the student picks up the fingerings, tone production, and music reading really quickly, so there are more possibilities as to what repertoire is appropriate and feasible for them to play. 

CPP: What do you like about the CPP Program?

SH: Everyone at the CPP office is super friendly and flexible. They understand if you cannot make a meeting because of ensemble rehearsals or class obligations. They understand that I’m in the program because I like to teach, and they ask very little else from me, which is such a relief compared to experiences I’ve had in the past. They are also fun and feed you a lot!

CPP: What would you tell other students who are interested in being a CPP fellow?

SH: I’d say if you are looking to positively influence and enrich the community around you through music, you are looking in the right place. Regarding the teaching fellowship, I really believe that by teaching others, we are teaching ourselves too. Whether it is through developing our own pedagogy, evaluating our musical values, or interacting with young people who have their own musical culture, the experience helps you grow as a musician and person.

CPP: Do you have a favorite story about a CPP experience?

SH: I was working with the saxophone section at Margarita Muniz Academy. I demonstrated on my saxophone going up and down a Bb concert scale and told them that now they were going to do it. They all exclaimed “yeah, right”, “I can’t”, and “you’re crazy”. After a few more nudges (and some real cheerleading for some), they all had it and were eating up the rest of the challenges I had for them that day.

CPP: What are some fun facts about you?

SH:
~I’ve taken at least 8 kids on their first roller coaster ride.
~My father is a music teacher and musician too. He runs a community band on the Eastern Shore in Maryland, in which my grandfather plays tuba and my brother plays euphonium.
~My mother is Korean and studied Korean Traditional Dance. My grandfather on her side taught traditional drums and singing. She has an older brother who is an opera singer in Germany.
~I was 10.5 lbs when I was born.


 


WHY DO I LIKE THESE THINGS? ARE MY EARS ON WRONG? CHARLES IVES